The Three Things Excellent Mentor Teachers Do

Ironically, excellent teachers often leave a lot to be desired as mentors to beginning teachers. Too often, their self-confidence tips over into an inadvertent egocentrism which leads them to think their less experienced charges should teach just like them.

And when their wide-eyed student teachers get excited about a creative and bold lesson idea they too often say, “That’ll never work.” And when a lesson doesn’t go well they tell their student teachers why.

In contrast, the best mentors know that teaching excellence takes many forms, therefore, it’s unlikely their student teacher is going to be a carbon copy of them. Consequently, they give their student teachers ample autonomy to find their way.

And when presented with a creative and bold lesson idea, the best mentors, even when they anticipate the classroom train jumping the tracks, say something to the effect of, “Let’s see how that goes.” They know student teachers learn best through trial, error, and reflection.

And when the classroom train sometimes does go off the rails, the best mentors channel Socrates and ask questions of their disheartened neophytes. In hindsight, what would you have done differently at the start of class? How might transitions have gone more smoothly? How can you make this good idea work better next time?

Because we assume mentoring excellence is intuitive, the best teachers don’t allows provide ample autonomy, allow for experimentation, and encourage self-assessment like the best mentors.