If You Only Read One Book This Summer

This is “Summer Book List” time of the year, but it’s unlikely you’ll find “The Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot: The True Story of the Tyrant Who Created North Korea and the Young Lieutenant Who Stole His Way to Freedom” on many lists of books to “take to the beach”.

The purveyors of those lists think we’re incapable of drawing upon many of our brain cells during June, July, or August; which is too bad because Blaine Harden’s book is as compelling and consequential as any I’ve read in a long time.

I’ve been a fan of Harden’s since reading Dispatches from a Fragile Continent, a book he wrote while reporting on Africa for the Washington Post in the late 80’s (yes youngsters, there was a time when newspapers had foreign bureaus). It doesn’t matter if you’re interested in Korean history or geopolitics, give Harden a chance and he’ll reel you in with engaging details coupled with clean and concise prose.

Loyal PressingPausers know I’ve become keenly interested in North Korea. In all of my extensive reading on the peninsula, this is the first work that has left me feeling complicit in the creation and continuation of the nightmare state. That’s what’s known as a “tease”.

Stick it to everyone recommending superficial summer fare by taking Harden to the beach. Exercise your mind. Then let me know what you thought.

2Q==

China’s Communist Rulers

Paragraphs to Ponder—From Richard McGregor’s “The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers.” (available in June)

Like communism in its heyday elsewhere, the Party in China has eradicated or emasculated political rivals; eliminated the autonomy of the courts and press; restricted religion and civil society; denigrated rival versions of nationhood; centralized political power; established extensive networks of security police; and dispatched dissidents to labor camps.

The rise of China is a genuine mega-trend, a phenomenon with the ability to remake the world economy, sector by sector. That it is presided over by a communist party makes it even more jarring for a Western world which, only a few years previously, was feasting on notions of the end of history and the triumph of liberal democracy.