Name YOUR Sources

The Victim-in-Chief lashing out at the media for their use of anonymous sources.

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The Victim-in-Chief’s most recent tweet:

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Focused on ratings in the midst of a serious, national public health crisis.

Trump is famous for his “many people say” variations. He could teach a master class at the Columbia School of Journalism on not just how to use anonymous sources, but how to make them up. Truly, he is genius at it.

Said ONE (anonymous) LUNATIC. Daniel Dale has asked if anyone know’s his source. So far, no one does. Probably because there is no source.

 

 

“A Baby In A Suit”

Mitch Albom, “Hey, President Donald Trump, her name is Gretchen Whitmer”. Props to DB for another assist.

“You’re familiar with the New Testament passage about, ‘When I was a child, I spoke as a child … but when I became a man, I put away childish things’?

Time’s up, Mr. President.”

And Albom wonders:

“How does any of this nonsense belong in press briefings about the biggest national health crisis in a century? How does tweeting out “I love Michigan, one of the reasons we’re doing such a GREAT job for them” — as if when Donald Trump loves you, then he’ll do a great job for you. Isn’t his responsibility to do a great job for everybody? In every state? Regardless of their governors?

All this petty nonsense should be gone at a time of national crisis. Yet, incredibly, it’s there. And we accept it. Why? Because three years is too long to rail against something that won’t change.

Let’s be honest. We have come to tolerate an infantile person in a grown man’s job, a baby in a suit.”

For a writer, what’s the equivalent of a “mic drop”, a keyboard drop?

Let’s not forget, Michigan is a swing state; thus proving, Borowitz is right.

Paranoia to Ponder

I have learned to roll with run-of-the-mill partisan excess, but this is of a different nature. So dispiriting.

From “A Single Gesture Behind Trump Fuels an Online Conspiracy Theory” in The New York Times.

“An analysis by The New York Times found over 70 accounts on Twitter that have promoted the hashtag #FauciFraud, with some tweeting as frequently as 795 times a day. The anti-Fauci sentiment is being reinforced by posts from Tom Fitton, the president of Judicial Watch, a conservative group; Bill Mitchell, host of the far-right online talk show ‘YourVoice America’; and other outspoken Trump supporters such as Shiva Ayyadurai, who has falsely claimed to be the inventor of email.

Many of the anti-Fauci posts, some of which pointed to a seven-year-old email that Dr. Fauci had sent praising Hillary Clinton when she was secretary of State, have been retweeted thousands of times. On YouTube, conspiracy-theory videos about Dr. Fauci have racked up hundreds of thousands of views in the past week. In private Facebook groups, posts disparaging him have also been shared hundreds of times and liked by thousands of people, according to the Times analysis.

One anti-Fauci tweet on Tuesday said, ‘Sorry liberals but we don’t trust Dr. Anthony Fauci.’

The torrent of falsehoods aimed at discrediting Dr. Fauci is another example of the hyperpartisan information flow that has driven a wedge into the way Americans think. For the past few years, far-right supporters of President Trump have regularly vilified those whom they see as opposing him. Even so, the campaign against Dr. Fauci stands out because he is one of the world’s leading infectious disease experts and a member of Mr. Trump’s virus task force, and it is unfolding as the government battles a pathogen that is rapidly spreading in the United States.”

And today, Trump is tweeting angrily about journalists not naming their sources. Why would anyone want to subject themselves to this bullshit? Trump’s behavior, including emboldening his supporters who attack his critics on his behalf, is a major reason sources are requiring anonymity. His supporters will connect those dots soon. Right?

 

A Playwriting Renaissance

Yes, Broadway is closed, but there’s lots of time for casting, learning of lines, and individual rehearsing.

Homeschooling, a story in 8 tiny acts, by Kevin Van Valkenburg, Senior ESPN writer.

-Ok seriously let’s focus now

-Um … let dad look that up

-You’re grouping numbers why?

-Sit in your chair please

-Do you talk to your teacher this way?

-I HAVE A CALL. HERE IS A SNACK

-It looks close enough to right

-(sobs quietly)

The Haircut, A comedy in one act, by one of my more talented siblings.

Setting: Two adults sitting at kitchen counter eating french toast and bacon.

In-law: Want to cut my hair?

Sib: Absolutely not. Do I look that stupid?

In-law: Maybe.

The End.

Call it nepotism, but if I’m funding one of these, it’s “The Haircut”. The last line, “Maybe.” is pure genius. A bold, compelling, humorous, utterly shocking twist that no one will anticipate.