I Am Now An Expert On All Things Hawaiian

Clickbait title, because after teaching a lot of Hawaiian students over the last 5-7 years, I’m still scratching the surface of understanding our most distinctive state.

Mainlanders who think they “know Hawaii” after spending a week or two at a resort are deluded.

Somewhere around 2015, someone at PLU decided to recruit the islands hard. And it continues.

Some observations in the form of gross generalizations.

On average, academically, they’re behind their mainland peers. Why is that? I don’t know.

On average, because Hawaii is a mosaic of different cultures, they’ve attended much more diverse K-12 schools.

Often, when you talk to them about multicultural education, their eyes glaze over. They are more inclined to embrace “colorblindness”, and as a result, dislike talking about race, class, and gender. Like Norway, they think their islands are free of cross cultural conflict, and yet, I hear and read stories about haole surfers getting beat up by native Hawaiian ones. There has to be more to the story doesn’t there?

I feel for them at this exact time of the year when the sun takes leave and the Pacific Northwest weather turns much cooler and wetter. How do they avoid being SAD I wonder?

Last, but not least, why haven’t any of them invited me to visit? Is it because they’re afraid I might out surf them?

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I Would Watch This Movie

Morgan Hoffmann left the PGA Tour in search of a cure. He found so much more.

Here’s the elevator pitch.

Young, free-spirited, athletic and muscular professional golfer has success on the PGA Tour until he’s diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. He becomes extremely disillusioned that the best Western docs have little hope for him living a normal life, let alone continuing his career. He puts his sticks away, moves to Costa Rica with his wife and dogs, lets his hair grow, surfs, and turns to alternative medicine. Gets better. Plans to return to competition.

Beautiful, Powerful, Markedly Different End-of-Life Celebrations

The on-line description of Mount Rainier Ranger Margaret Anderson’s memorial service was moving. As was the on-line retelling of Southern California surf-tech pioneer Sean Collins‘s recent memorial service.

Pictures of Anderson’s memorial are here. And here are more from Collins’s service.

One regimented, formal, set in a university auditorium, steeped in tradition. The other, free-flowing, informal, set in the ocean.

Notably different, yet equally beautiful and powerful celebrations of life.