Tesla-fy What?

Earlier this week I posted a vid about EV West, a California company that installs Tesla like electric technology into really old, but stylish cars nearing the end of their lives.

Makes me wanna go out and find a candidate for a Tesla transplant. And I have the perfect car. One of the best cars ever made in these (dis)United States. Some cars may be a little more reliable, but none more stylish. A car my family was lucky enough to own in the mid 1970s. Drum roll. . .

IMG_5732-762x456.jpgThat’s right an American Motor Corporation Gremlin in powder/purplish blue. Here’s another angle of one with a badass racing stripe.

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This was the zenith of American motor vehicle history. Why Japan’s auto companies didn’t unilaterally surrender, and how AMC didn’t make it, I’ll never know.

One warm sunny day in Cypress, CA, my two older brothers collided while repositioning the Gremlin and another one of our cars in front of our suburban tract home. I thought one of them was going to kill the other. Most funny thing I may have ever witnessed.

Middle Brother always struggled with the ladies, so feeling badly for him, moms gifted him the Gremlin before the “San Bernardino Mountains ski bum” chapter of his illustrious life. Once, while in the mountains, a falling bolder clipped our automotive masterpiece or at least that’s the story he tells.

His love life did improve after taking ownership of the Gremlin. How could it not? Similarly, I suspect I will draw much added attention after finding and Tesla-fying a Gremlin.

 

One Nation Under God, Indivisible, With Liberty and Justice For Those With Economic Means

How can anyone argue the U.S. is the indisputable best country in the world when our tax and health insurance systems are so flawed. On top of that, our legislature is broken. Yet, none of that has done much to quell our arrogance.

Reading David Grann’s story, Trial by Fire, from the New Yorker, reveals an even more fatal flaw. The more money one has, the better our judicial system works. Put differently, people are not equal under the law because not all people can afford competent, let alone expert representation. In the U.S. today, people’s ability to pay determines how much justice they receive.

If you don’t believe that, read Grann’s story about Todd Willingham. If you’re like me, when you finish it, you’ll be completely gutted. Gutted for the masses of working class people wrongly convicted. And gutted for what economic disparity has wrought.